Waste Not, Want Not

What I really like about this video is that it asks questions – gets one thinking about the entire life cycle of what we use and dispose of.  Humans are the only non-recyclable-waste producing species inhabiting this planet, but we don’t have to be.  Nature is the epitome of recycling; we are part of nature so why don’t we participate in this loop to a much greater extent?  Because we humans think we can control nature.  Please don’t misunderstand…I am in no way suggesting that people should be made or forced to participate in recycling via taxation or legal threat, particularly when done on a global basis.  I am not averse to paying to support local community utility services, but that’s where it needs to stay.  There is a time to “go global”, but there is also a time to understand when certain services need to remain at the community level to be most efficient.

Sustainability is about supporting the local economy.  [Quote at 43.22 minutes in the video – I couldn’t agree more!]

What I am suggesting is that we as individuals become more educated; that we as individuals take a few minutes of our precious time to at least briefly understand the entire birth/life/death cycle of that “thing” that you use for a little while and then throw away.  What I am suggesting is that we each become a little more responsible.  If we all share a heart-felt responsibility for this planet we live on, this planet that nurtures us, this planet that feeds our bodies, minds and souls – then there would be no need for “forced participation” in what is our responsibility to begin with.

One of the primary issues addressed by this video is the concept of “zero waste”.  Many people think that is impossible and why should we even strive for it, we should simply strive for a reduction.  Well, who gets to define what is a sufficient reduction?  That kind of thinking is exactly what leads us into the forced taxation/legal aspect because no one will have the exact same definition.  Zero waste carries the same definition no matter where you are, what you do.  Why not think outside the box and strive for that?  I find this same kind of negative attitude when I deal with some clients on health consults, whether it’s for themselves or their animal – “I can’t” do that, “I can’t” do this – I can’t feed my dog a raw diet because, because, because.  You can, I can, we can.  This is not to say don’t pause along the way and say – “look what we’ve accomplished, this is good!”  But don’t stop.  There is always a way to return to the flow of nature because that is where we are supposed to be.  Can’t doesn’t exist in nature – if something isn’t right at a given moment in time, then it doesn’t happen, something else that is appropriate will; the relationship between will determine what happens and when.  And that is what we humans have ignored for so long – that relationality; we stay too focused on ourselves or “things” and do not see what flows between.

Humans are potentially very creative, that is what defines us from non-human animals; we have the ontic (ego) organization that allows us to imagine what could be and then create it.  Non-human animals are experts at understanding nature and flowing – dancing, if you will – with nature.  Non-human animals are ultimately part of us in the greater scheme of things; they participate in our lives for reasons, we need them – all species old and new depending upon where humankind is in our own evolution of consciousness.  It is our responsibility to provide a continued safe haven (the Earth) for them and it is their “job” to re-engage us in the dance of nature, we have to learn how to let that happen without orchestrating it through some kind of conditioning…but I’m about to digress again – the chasm between operant conditioning/behaviorism and cognitive ethology is a huge one; a subject I will begin to address in coming months.  (See?  Everything really is related.)  Back to the subject of this post…

The video is about 54+ minutes long but well worth the time to listen.  It focuses on Seattle and the ways they have accomplished becoming much more green.  No, it didn’t happen overnight and it took a lot of people in a lot of different organizations working together – but that is what I find so wonderful about this, the true sense of community.  Baby steps at first, then you’ll be running before long!  It has made me realize that I could be doing more.  Please watch.  This video was also included in a featured post (Jan 18) on Dr. Mercola’s website here.

Interview between Dr. Mercola and Dr. Don Huber

An interview between Dr. Joseph Mercola and Dr. Don Huber about genetically modified organisms (GMOs) and roundup (Oct 3, 2013).  Dr. Don Huber is, in my opinion at least (as well as that of many others), one of the leading experts in GMOs in the world.  He is a recognized scientist, having been professor of plant pathology at Purdue University (Indiana, USA) for the past 35 years.  His research is focused on the epidemiology and control of soil-borne plant pathogens, and he specializes in microbial ecology, cultural and biological controls, as well as the physiology of host-parasite relationships.  Because of his extensive research and what he has learned over the past decades, he has become one of the most outspoken opponents of GMOs.  One simply cannot ignore the evidence this man has amassed as to the dangers of GMOs.

Animal “Whisperers”

What is wrong with this picture? What is wrong is that this is a completely human centric, human dominated way to approach an animal. It comes from an ego-centered need to control. It is not derived from an understanding of the species. For many people, this is a conscious, desired way of interacting with other species (and even with other humans); and for others it is simply because they have never opened their eyes to see another way. To watch this, one sees a condescending attitude toward the woman, and yet she seems in complete awe of these two, not unlike my memories of young girls swooning over the Beatles (ok…I probably did that part too -)). And this same condescending attitude carries over to interaction with the animals (although this intro video clip does not go so far as to work with the animals – it just leaves you with the feeling that these two animal “gods” will “fix” everything).

Can we live and interact with animals without the need for this kind of domineering approach? Absolutely. The “alpha horse” and “pack leader dog” theories were invalidated quite a number of years ago. Apparently not very many people got the message.  Jose Schoorl put it this way:  “This is so not 2013!”  We do not need to resort to these kinds of emotionally and mentally (and sometimes physically) abusive methods.  Animals communicate – they do it all the time.  We humans have to learn to SHUT UP once in a while and listen.  There is no “whispering” to Milan’s & Parelli’s methods.  With Parelli’s (and others) methods, yes, you typically get a submissive horse that will do “tricks” for you; you get a horse that will obey your commands.  You get a horse that has no depth to the eyes – the soul is lost, the feelings shut down.  It’s called learned helplessness – a recognized psychological disorder.  That is at least until you meet that one horse in a thousand or more that is very strong willed and doesn’t submit as easily.  Then you have to ramp up the physical part; then you get into a fight; then the human gets hurt…then the horse is labeled “crazy” and disposed of.

Learn the participative approach.  Learn to SEE the phenomena that exists between you and the animal – that is where the relationship is.  It is not in you, it is not in the animal – it is that energetic space in between.  It is the dynamic that flows between two beings – of any species.

 

Photo credit:  LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA: Host Cesar Millan and Pat Parelli pose for a picture.  (Photo credit  © Paul Coneys / MPH – Emery/Sumner Joint Venture)

 

Let’s Talk Dirt

Soils are being depleted at a rapid rate – why is this something that most people take for granted that will always be there? It won’t. Our health, our life depends on soil. Our horses greatly depend upon a healthy, viable soil to grow their food.
Outstanding animation in this video.